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Rural & Regional

Stronger Country Communities Fund

Funder:  NSW – Business

Grant Background: The Stronger Country Communities Fund was established in 2017 by the NSW Government to help deliver local projects to regional communities. The objective of the fund is to provide projects that improve the lives of people who live in regional areas.

The objectives of the fund are:

  1. to boost the liveability of communities in regional areas by providing new or upgraded social and sporting infrastructure or community programs that have strong local support
  2. to provide programs and infrastructure that enhance opportunities for young people to be work ready and thrive in regional NSW.

There is a total of $100 million available in Round Three, including at least $50 million for projects that improve the lives of young people (12-24 years old). The remaining funding can be provided for other local community and sporting infrastructure, street beautification, and community programs and events. Funds will be split across regional NSW according to a funding formula based on population and the cost of construction in each Local Government Area.

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A wooden farm gate and rusty wire fence with grass in the background
Community, Rural & Regional

Strengthening Rural Communities – Small & Vital

Funder:  Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR)

Grant Background: For smaller communities, regular access to funds can be a challenge, which is why the FRRR have created the Strengthening Rural Communities(SRC) program.

The following applications will be prioritised:

  • Projects initiated and delivered by local community groups.
  • Applications from communities fewer than 15,000 people.
  • Organisations that do nothave Deductible Gift Recipient (DGR) Tax status.

Strengthening Rural Communities (SRC) Small and Vital grants can be used for a wide range of purposes including:

  • Delivering activities, programs and services;
  • Purchasing or hiring equipment and materials;
  • Community infrastructure projects;
  • Operational and administrative costs associated with your project will be considered. This could include wages, paying a skilled contractor, or paying for overhead costs incurred in the project’s delivery.

Applications must clearly demonstrate a focus on one activity from the following seven activity areas.

1. Building community resilience

2. Developing organisational resilience and capacity

3. Enhancing environmental sustainability

4. Fostering cultural vibrancy

5. Lifelong learning and education

6. Economic strength

7. Improving community health and social wellbeing

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A wooden farm gate and rusty wire fence with grass in the background
Rural & Regional

Qantas Regional Grants

Funder:  Qantas

Grant Background: the Qantas Regional Grants Program aims to help communities sustain brighter futures. They are offering the chance to share $5 million in grants – $1 million each year over five years – to charities, organisations, causes, projects and individuals that help deliver direct services or benefits to regional communities.

The Regional Grants Program will provide financial, flight and marketing support to community groups and organisations to help further their causes and set them up for success.

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Agriculture, Environmental, Rural & Regional

Project Funding – Woodland Birds on Farms & Healthy Landscapes

Funder:  Central Tablelands Local Land Services (LLS)

Grant Background: Financial incentives for landowners working together with Central Tablelands LLS to protect and improve the health of the region are now available.

There are two projects where funding is available – Woodland Birds on Farms and Healthy Landscapes. These projects will provide incentive funding and technical support to targeted landowners to undertake a range of activities including fencing, alternative water sources, and revegetation that will protect and enhance habitat values on your property.

The Woodland Birds on Farms project brings together species experts and the community to help the Regent Honeyeater and other declining woodland bird species survive in the Capertee Valley, Mudgee-Wollar and South-west Slopes Key Biodiversity Areas on the Central Tablelands.

A high priority is to identify remnant vegetation that can be protected from degradation (clearing or inappropriate management) within the Key Biodiversity areas, which are important habitat for the Regent Honeyeater.

In areas where Regent Honeyeaters are known to nest, they will also look at creating more habitat to ensure young Regent Honeyeaters will have plenty of food when they can’t fly too far to search for it.

Healthy Landscapes project assists private land managers to improve the extent, condition and connectivity of native vegetation and streams in priority corridor areas across the Central Tablelands. These incentives will be available to landowners within the region’s priority corridor areas.

Projects linking to priority corridor areas through existing native vegetation will also be considered for funding. Local Land Services have worked with Local Councils to identify roadside sites of high conservation value. Their aim is to increase the extent of these areas by working with adjacent landholders to improve the condition of the Grassy Box Woodland on their properties.

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Agriculture, Community, Rural & Regional

Aussie Cotton Farmers Grow Communities

Funder:  Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal

Grant Background: Aussie Cotton Farmers Grow Communities is a grant program initiated to help support cotton growing communities across New South Wales and Queensland.

People living and working in rural and regional communities are best-placed to determine the groups and projects that most need support. Cotton farmers have the opportunity to nominate a deserving not-for-profit community-based group that is undertaking projects and activities that offer clear public benefit. They must be operating with a charitable purpose (i.e. not intended to just benefit an individual).

Recipients could include organisations like early childhood services, halls, community events, meals on wheels, neighbourhood houses, agricultural societies or other local charitable organisations.

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A wooden farm gate and rusty wire fence with grass in the background
Community, Rural & Regional

Tackling Tough Times Together

Funder:  Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal

Grant Background: The Tackling Tough Times Together grant program helps communities access the resources they need to support one another through the ongoing effects of the drought.

Grants are available for a broad range of grassroots, community-led initiatives that directly and clearly benefit local communities.

Projects must clearly demonstrate a focus on one activity from the following seven activity areas. Click on the activity to reveal examples of what could be funded.

  1. Building community resilience
  2. Developing organisational resilience and capacity
  3. Enhancing environmental sustainability
  4. Fostering cultural vibrancy
  5. Lifelong learning and education
  6. Economic strength
  7. Improving community health and social wellbeing

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Sunrise over a paddock containing cows
Agriculture, Rural & Regional

Young Farmer Business Programme

Funder:  NSW – Primary Industry

Grant Background: The Young Farmer Business Program is making grants of up to $10,000 (excluding GST) available to eligible groups across NSW. It will provide grants to groups who support young farmers and fishers to undertake training related to business and leadership development.

Activities should be targeting at least one of the following outcomes for young farmers and fishers:

  • knowledge and skills to improve social and business resilience;
  • knowledge and skills to manage risk;
  • knowledge and skills to execute effective plans;
  • knowledge and skills to make decisions that ensure the viability of their agricultural/fishing businesses;
  • access to new business ideas, tools and techniques; AND/OR
  • connect to other farmers/fishers and opportunities that enable entry and/or expansion of agricultural/fishing businesses;

What can we use the money for?

  • All costs associated with organising a project for young farmers or fishers to undertake activities related to business and leadership development.
  • Examples of projects include (but are not limited to) farm tours, commercial fishing business tours, workshops, events, business skills coaching, training, guest speakers.

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A black and white photo of a crowd of people walking along a street - Community
Community, Rural & Regional

In a Good Place

Funder:  Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal

Grant Background: In a Good Place is a national grants program that provides support for community-driven initiatives that reduce social isolation, increase social participation and connectedness, and encourage people in rural, regional and remote communities who are at risk of, or are experiencing, mental health issues to seek help.

There are three objectives for this program:

  1. Reduce social isolation;
  2. Increase social participation and connectedness;
  3. Increase help-seeking.

Preference will be given to projects that:

  • Serve communities with populations under 10,000;
  • Are run by and based in the beneficiary community/ies;
  • Respond to specific population mental health and wellbeing issues within a local community;
  • Are sustainable beyond the period of the grant;
  • Can clearly measure and report on project outcomes.

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A large group of people putting their hands and feet together on green grass
Community, Rural & Regional

Strengthening Rural Communities – Larger Leverage EOI

Funder:  Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR)

Grant Background: The Strengthening Rural Communities (SRC) program aims to give the thousands of small rural, regional and remote communities across Australia an opportunity to apply for funding that can support broad community needs.

The program criteria are deliberately flexible, and with applications being accepted all year round, communities have increased access to funds that can be used where and when a community knows it’s needed.

Through the Larger Leverage grants, small rural, regional and remote communities now have an opportunity to access funding to support more aspirational objectives, think bigger and leverage the ideas, creativity and resources of communities for bigger impacts and stronger, more connected communities.

Projects in both tiers must clearly demonstrate a focus on one activity from the following seven activity areas:

1. Building community resilience

2. Developing organisational resilience and capacity

3. Enhancing environmental sustainability

4. Fostering cultural vibrancy

5. Lifelong learning and education

6. Economic strength

7. Improving community health and social wellbeing

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A bright red heart and a stethoscope
Education, Health, Rural & Regional

Bush Bursaries

Funder:  NSW Rural Doctors & CWA

Grant Background: The NSW Rural Doctors Network (RDN) Bush Bursaries and Country Women’s Association (CWA) Scholarships provide selected medical, midwifery and nursing students in NSW/ACT with $1,500 each to assist with costs associated with their studies. Recipients also spend two weeks on a rural placement in country NSW during their university holidays. The placement combines the enjoyable aspects of country life and rural medicine.

Placements are coordinated by the rural Councils. Placement locations may differ each year due to the involvement of different Councils.

The two-week placements are usually undertaken in December or January.

Applicants must demonstrate:

  • an interest in rural practice and lifestyle;
  • an understanding of the realities of rural medical practice; and
  • the motivation to undertake a placement in a rural area as part of the scheme.

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